Emotion regulation in everyday life: Mapping global self-reports to daily processes.

StatusVoR
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Authors
Nezlek, John
Koval, Peter
Kalokerinos, Elise K.
Greenaway, Katherine K.
Medland Hayley
Kuppens, Peter
Hinton, Jordan D. X.
Gross, James J.
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Date
2023
Publisher
Journal title
Emotion
Issue
2
Volume
23
Pages
Pages
357–374.
ISSN
1931-1516
1528-3542
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Access date
2023
Abstract PL
Abstract EN
Recent theory conceptualizes emotion regulation as occurring across three stages: (a) identifying the need to regulate, (b) selecting a strategy, and (c) implementing that strategy to modify emotions. Yet, measurement of emotion regulation has not kept pace with these theoretical advances. In particular, widely used global self-report questionnaires are often assumed to index people’s typical strategy selection tendencies. However, it is unclear how well global self-reports capture individual differences in strategy selection and/or whether they may also index other emotion regulation stages. To address this issue, we examined how global self-report measures correspond with the three stages of emotion regulation as modeled using daily life data. We analyzed data from nine daily diary and experience sampling studies (total N = 1,097), in which participants provided daily and global self-reports of cognitive reappraisal, expressive suppression, and rumination. We found only weak-to-moderate correlations between global self-reports and average daily self-reports of each regulation strategy (indexing strategy selection). Global self-reports also correlated with individual differences in the degree to which (a) preceding affect experience predicted regulation strategies (representing the identification stage), and (b) regulation strategies predicted subsequent changes in affective experience (representing the implementation stage). Our findings suggest that global self-report measures of reappraisal, suppression, and rumination may not strongly and uniquely correlate with individual differences in daily selection of these strategies. Moreover, global self-report measures may also index individual differences in the perceived need to regulate, and the affective consequences of regulation in daily life.
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Keywords PL
Keywords EN
Emotion regulation
Individual differences
Extended process model
Daily life
Trait-state
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Acquisition Date18.04.2024
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