Self‐worth and politics: The distinctive roles of self‐esteem and narcissism

StatusVoR
cris.lastimport.scopus2024-05-16T03:10:29Z
dc.abstract.enOne of the classic questions in political psychology has been whether feelings of self-worth are relevant for politics. In this review, we summarize seven decades of research attempting to address this question, focusing on three sets of political outcomes: (1) political ideology, (2) political interest and engagement, and (3) intergroup relations. We rely on the distinction between self-esteem (feelings of adequacy and satisfaction with oneself) and narcissism (feelings of entitled self-importance and superiority over others). We argue that this distinction allows us to integrate the literature and explain the mixed effects observed in past research on self-evaluation and politics. Our review points to a key role of narcissistic status pursuit and psychological defensiveness in predicting potentially problematic political attitudes and behaviors. We discuss practical implications these associations might have for democratic functioning and for understanding political leaders. We conclude by identifying outstanding questions and promising new research directions.
dc.affiliationWydział Psychologii w Warszawie
dc.affiliationInstytut Psychologii
dc.contributor.authorCichocka, Aleksandra
dc.contributor.authorMarchlewska, Marta
dc.contributor.authorCisłak-Wójcik, Aleksandra
dc.date.access2023-05-16
dc.date.accessioned2024-03-29T10:04:48Z
dc.date.available2024-03-29T10:04:48Z
dc.date.created2023
dc.date.issued2024-04
dc.description.abstract<jats:p>One of the classic questions in political psychology has been whether feelings of self‐worth are relevant for politics. In this review, we summarize seven decades of research attempting to address this question, focusing on three sets of political outcomes: (1) political ideology, (2) political interest and engagement, and (3) intergroup relations. We rely on the distinction between self‐esteem (feelings of adequacy and satisfaction with oneself) and narcissism (feelings of entitled self‐importance and superiority over others). We argue that this distinction allows us to integrate the literature and explain the mixed effects observed in past research on self‐evaluation and politics. Our review points to a key role of narcissistic status pursuit and psychological defensiveness in predicting potentially problematic political attitudes and behaviors. We discuss practical implications these associations might have for democratic functioning and for understanding political leaders. We conclude by identifying outstanding questions and promising new research directions.</jats:p>
dc.description.accesstimeat_publication
dc.description.additionalvorArtykuł został już przypisany do konkretnego tomu (45) z datą publikacji 2024 oraz numerami stron 43-85
dc.description.issueS1
dc.description.physical43-85
dc.description.versionfinal_published
dc.description.volume45
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/pops.12897
dc.identifier.eissn1467-9221
dc.identifier.issn0162-895X
dc.identifier.urihttps://share.swps.edu.pl/handle/swps/102
dc.identifier.weblinkhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/pops.12897
dc.languageen
dc.pbn.affiliationpsychologia
dc.rightsCC-BY
dc.rights.questionYes_rights
dc.share.articleOTHER
dc.subject.enself-esteem
dc.subject.ennarcissism
dc.subject.enpolitical ideology
dc.subject.enintergroup attitudes
dc.subject.ensupport for democracy
dc.swps.sciencecloudsend
dc.titleSelf‐worth and politics: The distinctive roles of self‐esteem and narcissism
dc.title.journalPolitical Psychology
dc.typeJournalArticle
dspace.entity.typeArticle